Eden of Things – Day 2

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Making good progress

First task of the day was swapping out the Raspberry Pis from the sensors team and replacing them with x86 based machines. The compiler for the ESP8266 is x86 based and there is no Arm-based version that we could find, we could have rebuilt it, but it was more effort than pulling apart my office and bringing in my home computer and a spare that was being built as a Pi-Net server.

So we didn’t quite fit everything we wanted to into day 1.  It was really important that the teams had a chance to play with the technology and try a bit of coding, that meant we dropped on session on understanding source control using Git.  What better way to start a Tuesday than with a deep dive into source control, commits, merges, branches and detached heads. That is once we got started, we were slightly late today, as day 2 on the job and some of the teams rocked up late.

Once everybody was completely lost with git terminology, me included, the teams got into their respective tasks under the guidance of their mentors, Byran on Sensors, Ben on Core Systems and Paul on User Interface.  The teams had a steep learning curve, with most members having never experienced C, arduino, ESP8266, php, javascript, jquery, REST, etc, etc.  The mentors have been amazing, patiently leading and training the teams in everything from configuring a linux webserver, to building breadboard circuits and initialising SMART TVs. One problem I’ve experienced with teams is our culture doesn’t encourage enough celebration or recognition of achievement.  The teams here were no different.

One problem I’ve experienced with teams is our culture doesn’t encourage enough celebration or recognition of achievement.  The teams here were no different. As the teams started on their quests to master their allocate sub-system, little victories were silently occurring all the time, but you couldn’t tell.  The UI team had a little shout when then got the Smart TV to connect to their web server and display a page, but the sensor team managed to get an LED to flash on and off via the ESP8266 and there was nothing, not a whisper. This little victories are so important to celebrate, they enable the whole team to realise that we are making progress, they add an element of fun to proceedings and they make us feel good and bond as teams.  So with a little encouragement and praise we are making progress, there are more cheers happening all the time, we are starting to generate a buzz.

After a intense day of work we had our first show and tell at 3pm.  The UI team kicked off the presentations with a great looking screen with imagery they had created earlier in the day from around the biomes and some dummy data.  Finally, a round of applause and laughter, we’re making real progress, technically and socially.

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The Core systems team followed up with a visual less impressive but fantastic technical achievement demonstrating a working php based REST server and an agreement API architecture – no small feat.  More applause.

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Finally, the sensor team keep up the run of success, having moved on from the impressive display of a flashing LED, they showed how they had deployed a websever onto the ESP8266, connected to our sometimes flakey wifi and were able to get a reading from a light sensor on demand with a simple REST call. More applause and cheering!

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All teams have proven the fundamentals of the system architecture, now to pull it together.

A review meeting decide the next steps, now we know that all the basic concept could work, was to look into the realities of the physical environment we want to deploy into.  Is there a wifi signal, how strong is it, where should we place the sensors.  We don’t want to continue developing new features until we can prove that we have a working architecture from end-to-end – a walking skeleton.

And that was pretty much it for day 2, everybody disappeared into the biomes, smart phones out measuring wifi signals and seeing how high up into the biomes that could get. The good news is they found wifi, whether it’s strong enough for the ESP8266 we’re not sure, we’ll find out tomorrow……..

Oh, and git, we’ve had some commits! https://github.com/TheEdenOfThings

Great work everybody!!!!

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Integrating with JIRA

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I’ve started using the excellent Atalssain.NET SDK from Federico Sila Aramas, but hit issues quite quickly with displaying the correct fields to add an issue and knowing which of the fields are mandatory.  I’ve tried a few things and realised I’m going to need to use the JIRA REST API.  With a bit of help from Mike Jansen JIraRestClient, I’ve decided to updated the Atalassain.NET SDK to have more items in the classes, such as Project and use the Rest Client.  It’s a mix and match of SOAP and REST as I just convert the bits I need.  I’ll upload my fork of the SDK to bitbucket.